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You are cordially invited to the BIED Society's International Affairs Academy!
In The US and North America
Madeline Smith
Winter 21 Cohort
Winter 21 Cohort
Nov 24, 2020
Internal economic stability is an interesting metric to measure. I am curious how these charts would have looked if they compared more than just the male experience in the workforce. Economic stability is split by gender, but even more so by the race which has been especially exposed this year due to the increase in racial awareness in America. At the beginning of this document the question "what factors contribute to household-level economic insecurity" is asked which reminded me of a paper I read in an environmental injustice course last year that clearly finds that age, gender, education, remittances, unemployment, inflation, assets, and disease are the most important factors for dictating a household's economic security. All of these other than age and gender are directly impacted by a person's race. Policies that will promote racial equality in all aspects of the human experience (employment, housing, healthcare, etc) will improve the economic security of the country as a whole. I have high hopes for the incoming administration when it comes to their dedication to improving the household economic stability from a holistic perspective. The appointments that Biden has made thus far are already leaps and bound more inclusive and diverse. This, as I said yesterday, will improve the inclusivity of decisionmaking especially after a summer of racial tensions, bringing these issues to the forefront of policy formulation. Proven by voter turnout alone, a higher rate of citizens are engaging in politics due to the tumultuous year and divisive administration, which will hopefully spill over into the next administration as well. As far as this topic relates to China, economic security by household is laughable. This paper discusses how China is moving from traditional economic and social structures and how during this shift "welfare provision by the state has been dramatically reduced". An important aspect of Xi Jinping's upcoming14th Five-Year Plan is likely going to be the idea of "dual circulation". This is the concept that the domestic economy, or "internal circulation", will be "supplemented and reinforced" by the international economy, the "external circulation". This concept would likely focus on job opportunities, wealth redistribution, along with an ongoing push for innovation.
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National Security Strategy of the United States of America (Dec. 2017)
In The US and North America
Madeline Smith
Winter 21 Cohort
Winter 21 Cohort
Nov 23, 2020
The goal of "defending the homeland and projecting power globally, now and in the future" has been represented fairly consistently throughout the last two years. Donald Trump ran in the 2016 election with an aggressive "America First" platform that was initially thought to play out in an isolationist sense, although in practice it showed up as seemingly abrupt and unhinged decisionmaking in the name of American security. China and Russia have both been defining aspects of Trump's administration due to their centrality to this goal. 2018 began with Mueller indicting several Russian nationals, carrying on through mid-2019 when the investigation was closed. 2018 was also when Trump began targeting China with heavier tariffs and escalating the trade-war that we have seen play put for the last few years. Vice President Pence also gave a speech in October of 2018 dictating a rare clear articulation of policy from the administration stating that they planned to raise tariffs to combat economic aggression as well as condemn their actions in the South China Sea and increased censorship and persecution. It is very important to note that it is unlikely that the next administration will "go soft" on China, but I suspect that their actions will be made more analytically. The next National Military Strategy will be interesting to read in comparison to this one seeing as the current and incoming presidents have opposing views when it comes to defense. Even today, as more of Biden's picks for cabinet positions come to light, it seems at the very least we will have a much more well-rounded and diverse group of decision-makers, compared to the previous administration, which has statistically lead to a higher margin of actions that protect the widest scope of the American population.
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You are cordially invited to the BIED Society's International Affairs Academy!
In The US and North America
The People's Republic of China (PRC)
In Indo-Pacific and East Asia
Madeline Smith
Winter 21 Cohort
Winter 21 Cohort
Nov 16, 2020
China's relation to climate change is a very important one that has ramifications for the rest of the world's wellbeing. In 2018 China was the biggest CO2 emitter, releasing 10.06GT, but also is a leading innovator when it comes to sustainable technology and alternative power sources. It has been clear through the last four years that with the new US-China trade war, the US has all but forgotten about any allegiances to protect the environment, for example opening up historically protected lands for oil drilling. It is obvious that if the global community wants to create a significant impact on the speed that climate change is developing at, there is no hope without China. China's plan to be completely carbon neutral by 2060 is a very high goal and has gained worldwide skepticism in regards to its practicality. Many proposals call for the strategy of beginning to generate clean zero-emission power before moving into the implementation of this energy anywhere possible. The next step would then be to find ways to collect the pollution that is created when CO2 is released and ultimately storing it underground. Another proposal calls for nuclear energy production, increasing it to 28% on top of 21% wind, 17% solar, 14% hydropower, and 8% biomass. A large problem with this plan is the cost of shifting Chinese production off of fossil fuels. Coal-fired power alone accounts for more than 60% of all electricity in the country. Another ongoing barrier to China's 2060 goal is the construction of the Belt and Road Initiative. A study published in November of 2019 said that it was likely that the construction of these initiatives would disrupt the ecosystems of up to 800 different species. Chinese dams for hydropower along Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam are already disrupting river flow changes and fish migration (which in turn affects the communities on the coast). This is just one example of the disruption this project will introduce into the region.
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International Organizations
In Global Matters
Madeline Smith
Winter 21 Cohort
Winter 21 Cohort
Nov 13, 2020
The arguments I see against immigration, like the article stated, tend to be very repetitive. People are worried that the immigrants will take their jobs, lower their wages, hurt our already unideal healthcare system, and decrease national identity and by virtue national security. These have all been proven false on several occasions. For example, a study by George Borjas, a Harvard professor, said that the Mariel Boatlift (increasing Miami's population by seven percent in less than fifty days) actually had positive effects on the wages of Miamians. China has historically had a much larger emigration rate than immigration, 9.3million leaving in 2013 and only 594,000 immigrating to China in 2010 (these were the most proximal and recent years I could find). For several decades the immigration policy that ruled China has been the 1985 Law of Administration of Entrance and Exit of Foreigners that allows immigration into 31 different provinces or autonomous zones in China. In 2016 revisions were made to the regulations for permanent residency in China and this rate grew by 163% from 2015. When this document discusses the benefits on a society from immigration, China is a perfect example. China is the definition of a leader in globalization and although their immigration rates are not as high as western countries, the immigrants they do have are shaping its future. China is attracting more students than ever and as we discussed when addressing intellectual property and technological innovation, their attraction to high-skilled foreign workers has helped their economy and technology and research sectors immensely.
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Madeline Smith
Winter 21 Cohort
Foreign Affairs
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