Forum Comments

Space Overview
In The Center for Space Policy
International Arctic Policies
In Center for Arctic Policy
David Broughton
Spring 21
Spring 21
Apr 16, 2021
Today's document over China's Arctic strategy seemed like a sober portrayal of China as the global diplomat. Their statement that they will follow the rules and regulations of the International Maritime Organization raised many concerns. The CCP already question some of the rules the organization placed on maritime travel in the Indo-Pacific and actively challenge rules they do not agree with. Cooperation with Chinese characteristics is not an effective diplomatic model and China does not have the best track record with fully following international standards and norms. "China maintains that disputes over the Arctic shipping routes should be properly settled in accordance with international law" was a quote that made me chuckle slightly, since China is not seeking to resolve South/ East China Sea disputes through international processes. Banning commodities (Australian wine, Taiwanese pineapples, Japanese Dairy) and employing coast guard forces as militarized patrol's of disputed waters are not international norms for dealing with maritime disputes. My concerns of Chinese participation in the Arctic stem from a belief that China will always push for more and more influence. The document's emphasis on "Respect", "Cooperation", and "Win-win results" were a good talking point for the white paper but much is left to be seen regarding CCP cooperation with western states. Hopefully the Arctic can be a blueprint for further cooperation but concerns of IP theft in joint research facilities, aggressive economic tactics to capture necessary resources for industrialization, and aggressive maritime tactics to exert influence still remain. Cooperation is always prefered, but cooperation cuts both ways. The US should act in an reciprocal manner towards CCP policy; when they act aggressive, we respond with policies meant to diminish the effectiveness of the CCP aggression. But when they seek open and active collaboration, we should put differences in other policy areas aside and follow suit (wishful thinking).
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International Arctic Policies
In Center for Arctic Policy
International Arctic Policies
In Center for Arctic Policy
D
David Broughton

David Broughton

Spring 21
+4
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